Tag: Steel

Material Selection and Structural Sustainability

Material Selection and Structural Sustainability

While the green building movement continues to rapidly gain steam, building owners, architects, engineers and contractors have adapted their best practices to the ever-evolving sustainable design standards. A large part of this movement has been the LEED Green Building Rating System, introduced by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The program recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices, and certifies buildings that save money and resources, have a positive impact on the health of occupants, and promotes renewable, clean energy. The approach of the sustainable structural engineer starts with the materials selected for construction, namely concrete, masonry, steel and wood.

Continue reading “Material Selection and Structural Sustainability”

Seeing Eye-to-Eye at Opposite Ends of the Rope

Seeing Eye-to-Eye at Opposite Ends of the Rope

At the heart of it all, our industry comes down to teams working together to collectively build something greater than the sum of its parts. From the trade persons on the job site, to the design teams cooped up in their offices, and everyone in between, teams embody every step of the process. When it comes to the design team, nothing makes a project more successful than working together. Architects and engineers might not always speak the same language, but understanding each other’s needs goes a long way to avoid losing your design intent in translation.

With the goal to promote better communication and collaboration between architects and structural engineers, we have put together 10 things that are common issues throughout the life of a project. We have also invited FXFOWLE, one of our teammates on many successful projects, to share their insights on what we as structural engineers can learn from architects.

10 Things Architects Need to Know from Structural Engineers

General
1. Time is of the Essence 

Drafting is only a fraction of the work that must be done to complete a structural design. Most designs require the use of multiple analysis and design software programs, which then need to Continue reading “Seeing Eye-to-Eye at Opposite Ends of the Rope”